There are no longer any fire-breathing mountains in the Eifel,

but this has not always been the case. In the Tertiary period, around 45 to 35 million years ago, there were active volcanoes here. Around 1,000,000 years ago a new volcanic phase began. This ended with the most recent eruption 10,000 years ago, a blink of an eye for geologists.

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What is the difference?

The silicic acid and water vapour content have a defining influence on the viscosity of magma and the type of eruption on the earth’s surface.

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The Eifel’s volcanic superlative

In the Vulkaneifel, 75 maars have been scientifically proven. Of these, ten maar craters are always filled with water and harbour a maar lake – these are what the writer Clara Viebig poetically called the “eyes of the Eifel”.

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Yes, the cold water geyser in Wallenborn!

When there are special geological conditions in the ground underneath sparkling springs like for example cavities along fissures or strata, then spectacular things can happen.

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75 maars have been scientifically proven!

Maars are a defining characteristic of the Vulkaneifel. 75 maars have been scientifically proven and ten are constantly filled with water and contain a maar lake – the “eyes of the Eifel”.

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and why does it eject water so regularly?

The “Brubbel”, as the cold water geyser in Wallenborn is known, ejects water regularly, every 30 – 40 minutes or so, caused by carbon dioxide gas rising from the ground below.

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We don’t know!
Today there are no fire-breathing mountains in the Eifel, however the earth under our feet is moving.

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